Friday, August 19, 2005

Taking The Time To Enjoy


It is difficult to take time out of my busy day and think about life. It seems as though our default nature is to not think but rather to coast on auto-pilot. Whenever I do take the time I am often moved by the subtle ways of our world.

There are two ways to eat an apple. One way is to snatch one out of the bowl, wash it off and take a bite. Another way is to take a second and think about this thing called an apple. This apple probably sat on a tree for a good few weeks. It probably went through it's share of stormy days and powerful winds but held on by it's stem. It is interesting to note that all fruit - apples, bananas, oranges, peaches, plums, grapes and cherries are completely green before they ripen. They seem to hide out until they become edible.

This apple comes with an air tight covering to keep out bugs and lock in it's juices. If you leave it out to long, it will turn brown and save you from taking that soggy bite. Each apple comes with a free bonus that entitles you to a lifetime supply of apples. All the little seed needs is water, sunlight and tasteless soil to kick out roots, wood, bark, leaves and brand new delicious apples. When the apple is ready to be eaten it tells the tree to let go of it's stem.

Jews say blessings before they eat any type of food. The words of the blessings are beautiful and help us to remember where our food comes from. Blessings are also built in mechanisms to prevent monotony. It allows us to elevate the mundane and appreciate all of the worlds gifts. There is a source for everything and by learning to be more aware of this we live a much more meaningful life.

6 Comments:

At 8/21/2005 9:30 AM, Blogger Chai18 said...

since it was just shabbos i'll say just say this "lhavdil ben kodesh lchol"

 
At 8/21/2005 9:58 AM, Blogger Jew Speak said...

chai, short but to the point :)

 
At 9/01/2005 11:32 AM, Blogger Confused said...

I agree. The words of benching are beautiful, and after 18 years of saying this bracha, at least once a week, i first noticed this fact this past summer. It's sad the way we live life, oblivious, more than half the time, to teh beauty that surrounds us

 
At 9/28/2005 10:28 PM, Blogger Lvnsm27 said...

Beautiful post, JS

 
At 10/11/2005 3:21 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You a clearly a talmid of HoRav Avigdor Miller ztl. This was one of his favorite droshos. It's very true...

 
At 10/11/2005 6:51 PM, Blogger Jew Speak said...

Anon, "Duties of the Hearth" by Rabbi Bachaya Ibn Pakuda (11th Century) dedicates an entire chapter to this type of appreciation.

 

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